About

wheel1BodhiWheel is a space to explore the teachings of buddhism and life. Why do I say buddhism and life? Because these two are intrinsically linked. Even if we explore the deepest most complex teachings they eventually meander back to our present moment life experience. This is because the teachings of buddhism are about life, our lives, yours, mine and all living beings in the ten directions in which we share the universe with.

–  oh yes, I know buddhism should be capitalized but I want to de-emphasize the religiousness of it. 

cpv1.B&W

Who is it that is writing? – still working on that one. Nonetheless, I was born in Chicago, Illinois but spent most of my life in Southern California. I began my practice in the Dharma through the Chinese Chan tradition in the mid 90’s. In 2003 I was ordained as a buddhist monk in the Plum Village tradition, a Mahayana tradition, by Thich Nhat Hanh, given the name Thich Chan Phap Vu. Later, in 2011 I received the Lamp Transmission, a ceremony recognizing one as a Dharma Teacher.  Although I have been ordained for about fourteen years, now, I’m still new at it all  –       c phap vu

 

Supporting the Dharma through contributions

At the age of 19 Dharma years, in this body of 58 years, I have decided to follow the advice of the late Joseph Campbell and “follow my bliss.” It has been my aspiration for some time now to go and visit to support the various lay communities. Monasteries are wonderful. Many people come and practice and I constantly hear how much they feel they benefit from the experience. However, so many people will never go to the monasteries for one reason or another: They don’t have the money, too many obligations, family life, the distance, and so on.

My aspiration is to go and bring the teachings to the communities and help support them in their aspirations of community and practice. Typically, when monastics are asked to visit the lay communities it is to lead some event, such as a retreat or day of mindfulness: They arrive, lead some events, perhaps a day or two of sightseeing, and then they’re off. What if there is a monastic who would be willing to spend more time just to be with the community?

If you wish to help support through financial giving here is a link:     https://fundly.com/wandering-monk

If you want to read more about this journey go to    Of Transitions, The 100-foot pole, and a Wandering Monk